More Pimples than Dimples

January 20, 2015 3 Comments

Success is not attractive when it’s just cosmetic.

In a hospitality marketplace with too many choices, being noticed is more important than looking pretty!

Great looking bars and restaurants dot the map yet rarely cross the “T(errific)” intersection or consumer crosshairs!

In a world where more real, more authentic and more crafty is the badge of individuality and exception... “Pimples” work!

Of course, “Dimples” are the cute boy or girl next door look... but… why have what’s next door, when we can go out for fun and adventure elsewhere or everywhere!

Hands up for being the only “Pimple” on the block: having excited guests coming back for more is what it’s all about!

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3 Responses

Joao
Joao

March 27, 2015

. I concede the first two poitns, though I remain skeptical for a couple reasons. This technology has little precedent and our understanding of the human body is incomplete. I’m afraid I don’t share your confidence in human infallibility; we can and do make mistakes. Thus my preference for the precautionary principle. The comparison to digital watches is a false analogy. Watch technology does not raise the same concerns as replacing a large portion of our diet with genetically modified foods. Also, while we haven’t conducted long-term studies on watches per se, we have conducted those studies on radiation (which is the real issue). How else could we know that the amount and kind of radiation they give off is insufficient to break molecular bonds ?While a particular scientific study may not show bias when evaluated, its ideological framework must be evaluated as well. For example, the question of what we study depends on our priorities; in this country, we have prioritized product development over the basic rights of third-world farmers.The tyranny of the majority no doubt exists and should be avoided, but you misapply it here. The implication to your argument is that corporations like Monsanto are akin to blacks at the back of the bus. Corporations are not people (whatever the Supreme Court might say), and their individual rights should not be protected at the expense of the citizenry.Democracy demands an educated populace; we need information to make good decisions. Free markets similarly demand transparency to function. Labeling simply provides the consumer with factual information about a product.In the original article you wrote that niche consumerism is not an appropriate solution to the ecological problems, and that government is the only answer. That’s true only in a communist state or an autocracy in this country we enjoy economic freedom and our choices make very real impacts. If consumers stopped purchasing genetically modified foods, farmers would stop growing them. (You might rethink the word niche, too. The vast majority of Americans want these labels.)It’s valuable to consider these ethical issues in depth, and I commend you for your work. I appreciate, too, your willingness to facilitate discussion.

Froschi
Froschi

March 27, 2015

If you were at work your employer is uusally liable. Different countries have different laws for compensation and benefits. It may be worthwhile to talk to the HR manager of your employer or if you don’t want to do that, it’s best to consult a lawyer.

Nalin
Nalin

March 26, 2015

Thank you so much. In past relationships I have never skpoen up when something bothers me. As I have learned it is better to stay something then put up with something that bothers you. At least another hour before I find out anything. I will keep everyone updated.

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