HOT BUTTERED SCOTCH

September 14, 2017 1 Comment

 

 

The Hot Buttered Scotch is a delicious hot whisky drink to warm the heart and soul when it’s cold outside. A slice of salted butter, a teaspoon of Herbie’s Fragrant Sweet Spice blend and hot water gives this cocktail a rich and aromatic profile, while the MONIN Salted Caramel Syrup and the Balvenie 12 YO single malt gives it a touch of sweetness and classic Speyside single malt smoothness.

Recipe

Glassware: Uibi Rocks Glass
Ingredients:

  • 45ml Balvenie 12 Year Old DoubleWood Scotch Whisky
  • 10ml MONIN Salted Caramel syrup
  • 90ml Hot water
  • 1 Knob Salted butter
  • ½ Tsp. Herbie’s fragrant sweet spice

Method: Add butter to glass followed by sweet spice and hot water. Stir. Then add whisky and salted caramel syrup. Stir again. Serve with Shortbread biscuits.

Enjoy!

Cheers,
The Überbartools™ Team





1 Response

Fred Gruben
Fred Gruben

July 11, 2018

This is useless.

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